RESEARCH: NEWS ON UK CRYROTHERAPY & FM

From the News Desk of Jeanne Hambleton at fmsglobalnews.wordpress.com

We have been promised exciting news on the cold temperature treatment only available in a few clinics in the UK. The treatment is often used by professional footballers and sportsman for quick and successful healing. Our fibromite cryrotherapy reporter Marie-Caroline has promised us interesting news on a new UK study on this topic  -  hopefully  in the near future.

Marie-Caroline who has ‘been there and done that’  and feels better, says cryotherapy is a great and successful treatment that consists of exposing the body to extreme cold for several minutes.  It relieves and eliminates pain, promotes blood circulation, improves joint and muscular function, and releases endorphins.  It stimulates the body to heal and reduce pain. Marie-Caroline has been working with Professor Basant Puri and Iain Casey to get cryotherapy units introduced into hospitals.  A first cryrotherapy unit has been opened in a hospital in Hendon.
RESEARCH: Cryotherapy and Fibromyalgia  Courtesy of Editor Martin Westby          UK Fibromyalgia magazine  -  www.ukfibromyalgia.com.

Whole Body Cryotherapy (WBC) dates back to 1978, in Japan when a rheumatologist first started looking at the effects of extreme cold on his rheumatoid arthritis patients. The very encouraging results led to a Professor Fricke in Germany, taking on the research devoting 20+ years to studying the effects of WBC across a variety of chronic inflammatory conditions. Today in central and eastern Europe WBC is a widely accepted treatment for numerous conditions and is readily available to thousands of patients who suffer from conditions such as psoriasis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteo-arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis and Fibromyalgia.
CryoClinics was formed in 2011 in order to bring Whole Body Cryotherapy to the UK, so that people suffering from these conditions can have access to a safe non-invasive treatment that in conjunction with physical therapy modalities allows patients to better manage their pain leading to a better quality of life.
What happens?
The patient enters the chamber where the temperature is usually between -80 to -90 degrees celcius and only stays within for 3 minutes. This extreme cold induces a systemic response where the blood enters an “internal” cycle. That is the vessels in the periphery constrict forcing the flow to the core where it can feed the major organs in order to protect the body from what it perceives as a danger – the cold. There is no danger as the body is only there for 3 minutes. Once one leaves the chamber, the nutrient blood is pumped throughout the body resulting in reduced sensation of pain, reduced inflammation and a significant endorphin induced “high”. Depending on the condition and patient, the reduced pain can last for weeks allowing for more effective physiotherapy and resultant increased quality of life.
It is well documented that fibromyalgia sufferers do not like cold and that therefore this treatment would aggravate the symptoms. It is important to note that while the cold is extreme (it is colder than the lowest temperature ever recorded on earth) it is a dry cold. It is much more comfortable than an ice bath! But it is the extreme cold and relatively brief exposure to it that makes this treatment both much more comfortable and effective. The skins thermal proprioceptors trick the brain into a fight or flight mode which results in the various physiological responses and it is these responses and subsequent change in the chemical balance in the blood that effect such positive results.
CryoClinics state WBC is now available in the UK. Presently this treatment can only be found at BMI The Garden Hospital in Hendon, north London. They have been conducting their own case studies in conjunction with the hospital and would welcome any fibromyalgia sufferers who would like to try WBC. www.cryoclinics.co.uk

Our thanks to  Editor Martin Westby of  Uk Fibromyalgia magazine  for permission to reprint this article that had been featured in his magazine. http://bit.ly/1304asj.

RESEARCH: FIBROMYALGIA US PATIENTS IMPROVE WITH CRYOTHERAPY

From the News Desk of Jeanne Hambleton @ fmsgloblnews.wordpress.com

Courtesy of www.ProHealth.com • May 5, 2013 & Rich Carson

Editor’s comment:  Cryotherapy is the local or general use of extremely low temperatures in medical therapy.  The simplest and most familiar form of localized cryotherapy is the ice pack, frequently recommended to reduce pain and swelling.  Whole body cryotherapy involves exposing the entire body to an ultra-low temperature for three minutes or less using a cryogenic chamber.  One of the benefits is said to be the triggering of a systemic anti-inflammatory response.  The dry, cold air used in the chamber is supposed to help sustain a reduced muscle temperature without compromising the skin or core temperature.  The superficial skin temperature quickly returns to normal, while deeper tissue and muscle temperatures remain cold, prolonging the anti-inflammatory effect.  A number of studies over the past two decades (primarily in Europe) have found whole body cryotherapy to be an effective treatment for a variety of painful inflammatory conditions, including fibromyalgia. Effects of 15 consecutive cryotherapy sessions on the clinical output of fibromyalgic patients.By Lorenzo Bettoni, et al.

Abstract:

Fibromyalgia is a chronic widespread pain disorder in which, the neurogenic origin of the pain, featured by allodynia and hyperalgesia, results from an imbalance in the levels of neurotransmitters and consequently of the peripheral pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators.

Whole body cryotherapy is a peculiar physical therapy known to relieve pain and inflammatory symptoms characteristics of rheumatic diseases, through the regulation of the cytokine expression.

The aim of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the effects of cryotherapy on the clinical output of fibromyalgic patients. A total of 100 fibromyalgic patients (age range 17-70  years) were observed; 50 subjects were addressed to cryotherapy, while the second group (n = 50) did not undergo  the cryotherapic treatment. All subjects kept the prescribed pharmacological therapy during the study (analgesic and antioxidants). The referred health status pre- and post-observation was evaluated with the following scales: Visual Analogue Scale, Short Form-36, Global Health Status and Fatigue Severity Scale.

Fibromyalgic patients treated with cryotherapy reported a more pronounced improvement of the quality of life, in comparison with the non-cryo treated fibromyalgic subjects, as indicated by the scores of the qualitative indexes and sub-indexes, that are widely recognized tools to assess the overall health status and the effect of the treatments.

We speculate that this improvement is due to the known direct effect of cryotherapy on the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators having a recognized role in the modulation of pain.
Source: Clinical Rheumatology, May 2, 2013.  By Lorenzo Bettoni, Felice Giulio Bonomi, Viviana Zani, Luigia Manisco, Annamaria Indelicato, Patrizia Lanteri, Giuseppe Banfi abd Giovanni Lombardi. Reumatologia/CT, Ospedale di Manerbio, A.O Desenzano del Garda, Italy.

RESEARCH: Fibromyalgia and Pregnancy study

From Jeanne Hambleton’s  News Desk of fmsglobalnew.wordpress.com

The following  information has been received today from Mark Cropley, Professor of Health Psychology in the Department of Psychology, University of Surrey in Guildford, Surrey.

Ana Tunaru, postgraduate student in Health Psychology at the University, is carrying out a research study under the supervision of Professor Mark Cropley .

This research aims to explore the links between fibromyalgia and pregnancy, and participants are needed to share their lived experiences in relation to this topic.

Ana said, “We are looking for participants, adult pregnant women who are reaching their third trimester of pregnancy. The individual interviews would take up to an hour and will be held at a convenient time and place for you.

“In order to take part, you must have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia at least 2 years prior to the onset of your pregnancy, have no complicated pregnancy and speak English fluently.”

If you  can help and are interested to participate in this study, please  email Anna at at00208@surrey.co.uk to receive a form to express an interest in the study.

For any further information, please don’t hesitate to contact Ana Tunaru, at the above email address or by phone at 075 036 54 920.

Thank you in advance for your interest!
I am a postgraduate student in Health Psychology at the University of Surrey and I am carrying out a research study under the supervision of Professor Mark Cropley. This research aims to explore the links between fibromyalgia and pregnancy, and we need participants to share their lived experiences in relation to this topic.

The individual interviews would take up to an hour and will be held at a convenient time and place for you.

In order to take part, you must have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia at least 2 years prior to the onset of your pregnancy, have no complicated pregnancy and speak English fluently.

If you are interested to participate in this study, please fill in the express of interest form enclosed and email it to at00208@surrey.co.uk.

For any further information, please don’t hesitate to contact Ana Tunaru, at the above email address or by phone at 075 036 54 920.

Thank you in advance for your interest!